The Simple View of Reading (SVR)-Part 3

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The Simple View of Reading (SVR)-Part 3

 

This is the concluding part of this blog. Part 1 provides an introduction to this reading model and the profile “Specific Word Reading Difficulties,” which includes dyslexia. In Part 2, I introduced the reading profile “Specific Comprehension Difficulties.” which at its most extreme includes the condition known as Hyperlexia. In Part 3, I again use the visual representation of the four reading profiles, but this blog focuses on the bottom left quadrant; the “Mixed Reading Difficulties” (MRD) profile. 

 

LangCompVsDecoding_2

 

This is where we find our weakest students, and some of the most challenging to remediate. These are the students that really struggle. Their decoding and reading comprehension are both below average, and that includes comprehending the passages they can successfully decode. Their reading fluency is also often weak because of their difficulties with both decoding and with language comprehension. This dual weakness creates a compound effect that compounds any weakness in reading comprehension, although some of these students may have strengths in certain areas of language or reading. For example, they can build a very strong knowledge base in an area of specific interest to them. 

 

These students require a combination of the interventions that address the two profiles I discussed in Parts 1 and 2.

 

For example, they need explicit and systematic interventions in phonics alongside language and reading comprehension support that target their specific weaknesses, which may be vocabulary and/or inferring, and so on. The Orton-Gillingham Online Academy provide a Level 1 Basic Language Course that would meet their phonic needs., Alongside of this it is important to use a phoneme-level or phonemic awareness approach, that will teach letter sounds, along with blending, segmenting, and manipulation of those sounds. In Part 1, I listed a number of resources to support these areas and others to address fluency issues, which students who exhibit MRD will also display. 

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Simultaneous to addressing these basic reading skills, MRD students also require interventions that address language comprehension. Addressing language comprehension isn’t a matter of teaching skills, instead it requires developing thinking processes and strategies that allow them to make sense of the world and of what they are reading. In Part 2, I listed a number of resources that build language comprehension and improve reading comprehension. The program “Expanding Expressions,” is an additional resource which can help students pull valuable information from their reading,  and also develop their writing skills, making it suitable to support students with a Specific Comprehension Difficulties, or Mixed Reading Difficulties profile. 

 

This blog concludes this series on the Simple View of Reading, however my next blog on the topic of Compensating Students, is closely related.  

 

Compensating students fit in the top right quadrant of our reading profiles visual. That is they are part of the group of skilled, fluent readers, but as I will demonstrate, this group of students, are actually underperforming compared their potential, as they compensate for their weaknesses.Their scores fall into the average range so they often go unnoticed and rarely get the help they need and deserve. These are often some of our brightest students and yet they can become what Dr Selznick terms “Shutdown Learners.”

 

Additional sources: 

 

1. I’d like to thank The AIM Institute and Dr Louise Spear-Swerling for providing the Access to the Experts Community Speaker Series session, How Understanding Profiles of Reading Difficulty Can Help You Help Your Child. A recording of this presentation along with her handout is now available for free through the AIM Institute and will be until October 5th, 2018. 

2. Maria S. Murray Ph.D. What is the Simple View of Reading? What it Means for Meaning-Making.

3. David A.Kilpatrick, Ph.D. Equipped for Reading Success

 

Lorna

 

Lorna Wooldridge is a dyslexia specialist tutor with over twenty-five years of experience and qualifications in the field of learning differences, from both the UK and USA. Lorna has a unique perspective on this condition as she has dyslexia, and her passion is to serve this community in any way she can.

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